Vintage Advertisements: 1983

I have a Rolling Stone magazine archive that I occasionally like to browse to read original articles/interviews with my favourite artists, study era-specific fashion and review vintage advertisements, the great barometer of our life and times as a society. Here are some ads from the year Michael Jackson dropped "Thriller" and McDonalds introduced the "McNugget" - 1983: 

Great series of Budweiser beer advertisements that prompted readers to write in to receive a complimentary 20"x26" version (1983). 

Great series of Budweiser beer advertisements that prompted readers to write in to receive a complimentary 20"x26" version (1983). 

Great series of Budweiser beer advertisements that prompted readers to write in to receive a complimentary 20"x26" version (1983). 

Great series of Budweiser beer advertisements that prompted readers to write in to receive a complimentary 20"x26" version (1983). 

Great series of Budweiser beer advertisements that prompted readers to write in to receive a complimentary 20"x26" version (1983). 

Great series of Budweiser beer advertisements that prompted readers to write in to receive a complimentary 20"x26" version (1983). 

It was a simpler time for dating in the early 80s… I would be totally down with having some drinks at an arcade (if they still existed) (1983). 

It was a simpler time for dating in the early 80s… I would be totally down with having some drinks at an arcade (if they still existed) (1983). 

Sexual innuendos are part of every decade (1983). 

Sexual innuendos are part of every decade (1983). 

Advertisement for Frisbee…it's somewhat refreshing to view advertisements before the age of Photoshop. Any hint of hair on a woman's leg would not be tolerable today (1983).

Advertisement for Frisbee…it's somewhat refreshing to view advertisements before the age of Photoshop. Any hint of hair on a woman's leg would not be tolerable today (1983).

The style of the early 80s was quickly being defined by the yuppie look (1983).

The style of the early 80s was quickly being defined by the yuppie look (1983).

For whatever reason, a lot of early 80s advertisements replicated being on a different planet. Apparently everyone was trying to escape Devo (1983). 

For whatever reason, a lot of early 80s advertisements replicated being on a different planet. Apparently everyone was trying to escape Devo (1983). 

I always remember the omnipresent Calvin Klein advertisements from the 90s that featured a naked Kate Moss (1983).

I always remember the omnipresent Calvin Klein advertisements from the 90s that featured a naked Kate Moss (1983).

I only included this because it is the flattest arse I have ever seen, selling jeans no less (1983). 

I only included this because it is the flattest arse I have ever seen, selling jeans no less (1983). 

The headline from this advertisement could describe the modern iPhone (1983). 

The headline from this advertisement could describe the modern iPhone (1983). 

This NIKE advertisement reminded me of visiting the medieval wing of a European art gallery (1983). 

This NIKE advertisement reminded me of visiting the medieval wing of a European art gallery (1983). 

Ballerinas were featured in a lot of advertisements in the early 80s…including this one, curiously selling cigarettes (1983). 

Ballerinas were featured in a lot of advertisements in the early 80s…including this one, curiously selling cigarettes (1983). 

Manly men smoke (1983). 

Manly men smoke (1983). 

The Timex Sinclair Computer System is the first advertisement I've seen for a product that is similar to computers and the internet of today (1983).

The Timex Sinclair Computer System is the first advertisement I've seen for a product that is similar to computers and the internet of today (1983).

Advertisement for a book on the joys of pigging out on food. Oh, America (1983). 

Advertisement for a book on the joys of pigging out on food. Oh, America (1983). 

What is a modern day yuppie? Or are they extinct? (1983).

What is a modern day yuppie? Or are they extinct? (1983).

Lord, have mercy (1983). 

Lord, have mercy (1983). 

Vintage Advertisements

Oui Magazine:
(Rolling Stone issue 196, September 1975) 
Eldridge of Paris Fall Collection:
(Rolling Stone issue 197, October 1975) 
Polaroid:
(Rolling Stone issue 200, November 1975) 
Toyota campaign:
(Rolling Stone issue 199, November 1975)
(Rolling Stone issue 201, December 1975) 

Vintage Advertisements

Rolling Stone Magazine t-shirts:
(Rolling Stone issue 180, February 1975) 
I'm pretty sure I saw the guy in red at The Forks' skatepark last week. 
Janis Joplin "Janis" album posthumous release:
(Rolling Stone issue 188, June 1975) 
Fender Guitar fairy tale campaign:
(Rolling Stone issue 188, June 1975)
(Rolling Stone issue 190, July 1975) 
(Rolling Stone issue 193, August 1975) 
Fender always had the most creative advertising campaigns.  

Vintage Advertisements

Spooky Tooth 'You Broke My Heart, So I Busted Your Jaw' album release:
(Rolling Stone issue 136, June 1963) 

HearMuffs™ Headphones:
(Rolling Stone issue 137, June 1973)

Copy reads: "The worst thing you could take to bed when you're feeling warm and cuddly are cold, lumpy headphones...HearMuffs don't look like headphones; they look more like a giant fuzzy doughnut with a bite missing."

Gibson Guitars:
(Rolling Stone issue 151, January 1974)

Fender Guitars:
(Rolling Stone issue 169, September 1974)

Holy phallic symbol!

"Wipe Your Face, You Just Swallowed My Soul" written by Hugh Prather:
(Rolling Stone issue 174, November 1974) 

Believe it or not, this is billed as a philosophy book. I'm surprised the title hasn't been used in a Nickleback song...yet.  

Winston cigarettes:
(Rolling Stone issue 175, December 1974) 

Vintage Advertisements

Words & Music Magazine:
(Rolling Stone issue 95, November 1971)

Tom Rush 'Merrimack County' album release:
(Rolling Stone issue 112, July 1972)

More cringe-worthy copy promoting some dude I've never heard of (but I'm willing to bet has an STD or two).

Fender series:
(Rolling Stone issue 126, January 1973)
(Rolling Stone issue 127, February 1973)
(Rolling Stone issue 130, March 1973) 

Vintage Advertisements

Himalaya brand "hairy" poncho:
(Rolling Stone issue 66, September 1970)

The Moody Blues 'Question of Balance' album release:
(Rolling Stone issue 66, September 1970)

Marijuana Plant Sale - 20" plant $1.50; 60" plant $22.00:
(Rolling Stone issue 66, September 1970)

 

Vintage Advertisements

The Guess Who 'American Woman' single release:
(Rolling Stone issue 54, March 1970) 

Pacific Gas & Electric 'Are You Ready?' album release:
(Rolling Stone issue 60, June 1970) 

I have to say, I've never associated America with poverty but to be fair, Bob Geldof wasn't around to enlighten these guys at the time.
 

Mendocino County, California land at $450-$800 per acre
Peace watches for $14.00 (available today at Dollarama)
Radio airtime for aspiring DJs at $20.00/hr ($10.00/hr after midnight):

(Rollling Stone issue 65, September 1970) 

Vintage Advertisements

The 60s were a blur. I've just completed perusing old issues of Rolling Stone magazine from the decade on my Cover to Cover DVD archive. It's been quite fascinating to read through history as it happened; I can't help but imagine what it would have been like to come of age during such a magical era. Although I must say, as someone who doesn't partake in any illegal substances (heck, I don't even drink alcohol), I am slightly scandalized by the bi-weekly inclusion of a feature devoted solely to the positive aspects of drugs. Eat it, lick it, snort it, f*** it...can you imagine if the magazine did that today? It would inadvertently become a campaign for D.A.R.E.. No matter how hard you try, you can't Photoshop the ugly off a methhead. 

But now...onto some vintage advertisements. 

Telex 8-Track Recorder:
(Rolling Stone issue 47, November 1969) 

Globe Propaganda (coalition of album cover artistes):
(Rolling Stone issue 48, November 1969) 

Eric Andersen s/t album release:
(Rolling Stone issue 49, December 1969)

I plead ignorance in knowing who Eric Andersen is, but had to include this vintage advertisement for the cringe-worthy copy alone: "Anyone who looks as good as this, shouldn't sound as good as this."